Hearing Loss and Medicine
5. Taking Public Transportation

People who live in big cities and utilize public transportation are at greater risk to serious hearing loss than those who simply carpool to work. Unlike those constant noises on the job that wear away the lining of the inner ear over time, sounds from public transportation can be quite loud and abrupt. The loud squeaking, grinding, and clanging of subway trains, for example, put regular riders at a significant risk for hearing loss. These loud noises only occur for shorter periods, but the decibel levels are much higher and will cause more damage in less time. Drivers of buses and trains might already be aware of the potential dangers and wear the appropriate ear protection, but usually the riders are less inclined to follow suit.

6. Taking Medication

Many of the medications that you may be taking on a regular basis have chemical properties that are toxic to the cells within the inner ear. Chemotherapy drugs, antibiotics, and pain medications all can have a negative impact on your hearing because they gradually destroy the lining of the inner ear each time they are taken. People who take medications every day can one day wake up to complete silence after the inner ear has completely been destroyed. One reason it is important to understand the side effects of any drug that you are taking is because the damage is often quick, rapid, and permanent.

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