Wet Hair Problems
The Growth of Dandruff

No one wants those unsightly dry flakes of skin on their scalp, and in fact most hair shampoos and conditioners are designed to combat this one problem. When you go to bed with wet hair at night, you are not only making the problem of dandruff worse, you are also wasting all your money on those products designed to eliminate flaky skin in the first place. Dandruff can be caused by a fungal infection, and a damp, warm pillowcase coming in contact with your head every night for hours at a time is not good. Once the dandruff begins, you will notice that the itchiness of the scalp becomes more prevalent. This interrupts your sleeping pattern each night, as you try to scratch and eliminate the itch. As these dead skin cells begin to accumulate on the scalp, this unpleasant disorder becomes worse. Luckily, this problem is easily solved: once you have your scalp treated, simply wash your pillowcases more often and be sure your hair is dry to the touch before lying down each evening.

Ringworm of the Scalp

One of the most dangerous effects of sleeping with wet hair is getting ringworm of the scalp, medically known as tinea capitis. The infection is identified by small patches of bald spots appearing on the scalp. When you go to bed each night with wet hair, the moisture left in the pillowcase causes the growth of fungus that can transmit back to your scalp while sleeping. Over time, the hair begins to break near the surface of the scalp, which in turn results in those growing patches of bald areas. The ringworm that affects your scalp can have further damaging effects if not identified and treated early on. This disease is highly contagious, meaning that if you contract the fungus and you and your partner switch or share pillows, the ringworm can be transmitted to them as well. Even if they do not sleep with wet hair, this disease will attack their scalp and eventually lead to hair loss. At the first signs of any hair loss, your skin and your bed must be treated accordingly.